Tusch [Fanfare]  2015

Tusch [Fanfare]

Installation view, Wentrup, Berlin, 2015

Tusch [Fanfare]

Tusch-carnival [Fanfare-carnival]

6 cannonballs cast in bronze, foil plot,
Ø 19 cm (each), 118 × 262 cm

Tusch [Fanfare]

Tusch-carnival [Fanfare-carnival]

6 cannonballs cast in bronze, foil plot,
Ø 19 cm (each), 118 × 262 cm

Tusch [Fanfare]

Tusch-classic [Fanfare-classic]

4 cannonballs cast in bronze, foil plot,
Ø 19 cm (each), 118 × 197 cm

Tusch [Fanfare]

Tusch-classic [Fanfare-classic]

4 cannonballs cast in bronze, foil plot,
Ø 19 cm (each), 118 × 197 cm

Tusch [Fanfare]
Tusch [Fanfare]
Tusch [Fanfare]
Tusch [Fanfare]
Tusch [Fanfare]

Tusch is a sequel to her work Marsch from 2014, which was shown at several venues, including an outdoor installation at Kunsthalle Basel. Castings of 17th century cannonballs are the basic elements in Marsch and Tusch. A Tusch is a fanfare, usually played in performative contexts to introduce, conclude or emphasize speeches or performances by honored soloists or conductors. Aladağ notates one such Tusch on the wall – the heads of the notes are the cannonballs, which undergo a musical reinterpretation of their original ballistic milieu. Nevertheless, Aladağ leads us back to the projectile context, for it is a fanfare that introduces the shooting of the cannon in the circus. The cannonballs’ notation depicts the fanfare that acoustically announces the entrance into the ring.