Colors  2017/2016/2012/2010/2008

Colors

Installation view, Wentrup Gallery, Berlin, 2012

Coloured nylon stockings, Poul Henningsen lamps

Colors

Installation view, Tactics of Invisibility, Arter, Istanbul, 2011

Colors

Installation view, Tactics Of Invisibility, Tanas, Berlin, 2010

Colors

Installation view, U-Turn Quadriennale, Copenhagen, 2008

Colors

Colors, dotes and stripes, 2017

Colors

Colors, orange, 2017

Colors

Colors, red net, 2017

Colors

Colors, day and night

Colors

Colors, blue red, 2012

Colors

Colors, green blue, 2012

Colors

Colors, yelllow lack dotted, 2012

Colors

Colors, brown black, 2008

Colors

Colors, red blue, 2010

Colors

Colors, black blue, 2010

Colors

Colors, green black, 2010

Colors

Colors, red pink, 2010

Colors

Colors, camouflage, 2010

Colors

Colors, pink nude, 2010

Colors

Colors, yellow green, 2010

Colors

Colors, violet red, 2010

Colors

Colors, black white, 2010

Colors

Colors, turquoise white, 2010

Colors
Colors
Colors
Colors
Colors
Colors
Colors
Colors
Colors
Colors
Colors
Colors
Colors
Colors
Colors
Colors
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Colors
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Colors

Various sizes: Poul Henningsen lamps

PH4/3, H 20 cm, Ø 40 cm

PH5, H 28,5  cm, Ø 50 cm

PH 5-4½ Charlottenborg, H 31,8 cm, Ø 46,6 cm

PH 6½-6 Charlottenborg, H 50 cm, Ø 65 cm



In Nevin Aladağ’s piece Colors we encounter colour on multiple levels. Phenomenologically we are confronted with a set of lamps whose luminosity and appearance was masked by coloured tights. Through the title alone (and its North American spelling), the artist embeds this work in a discourse around skin-colours and politics. Already in 1952 Ralph Ellison decries the social invisibility through a “wrong” colour of skin in his novel “Invisible Man”. Moreover, Colors points to Dennis Hopper’s movie “Colors” from 1988, which can be seen as a sociological study on colour in a metaphorical and literal sense: here gang life and graffiti are at stake. Furthermore, Aladağ uses lamps that refer to Danish design icon Poul Henningsen’s classics and makes them undergo a sculptural and gender loaded alteration. Colors brings therewith various readings of colouration together, on an epistemological, sociological and aesthetic level that let us question the (in)visibility of colour.

(excerpt of the text by Nico Anklam)